Allergy & Asthma News

Screen Shot 02-13-14 at 02.01 PM       WORLD ALLERGY WEEK - April 7-13, 2014

World Allergy Week is just around the corner! See what is going on in your local area to increase your awareness about Food Allergies.


"Allergy Fix" Documentary on CBC TV -

The Nature of Things

Scientists are attacking food allergies in new and inventive ways, driven by the alarming increase in the number of people, particularly children, who suffer from them - and can die from them. Click on the link below.

http://www.cbc.ca/natureofthings/episodes/the-allergy-fix


WORLD ASTHMA DAY - MAY 6, 2014

World Asthma Day is an annual celebration organized by the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) to promote asthma awareness and care around the world. World Asthma Day will take place on Tuesday, May 6, 2014 around the theme "You can control your Asthma". To find out more about World Asthma Day and GINA, please visit their website http://www.ginasthma.org


Building Peanut Tolerance is Possible

Peanut  

Studies are showing that it is safe and possible for peanut allergic individuals to develop a tolerance to peanuts. Researchers point out that the process of building tolerance is not yet perfected and must be done under the close supervision of trained health care professionals. However, recent research is providing hope that in the future, peanuts may pose less risk for those who are allergic. See the link below for CBC news summary.

http://www.cbc.ca/player/News/Health/ID/2433681293/



Allergy App for Teens & Young Adults

whyriskit1

Anaphylaxis Canada created an app for teens and young adults at risk for anaphylaxis. This app includes allergy information, FAQ's and more. The app is available for the iPhone, Android and Blackberry devices. Choose below to access the app for your personal device. For more information about the app, click here.

iPhone

Android

Blackberry

 

No need to delay introduction of food allergens to high-risk babies

Joint statement by the Canadian Pediatric Society and the Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
 
Babies who are at high risk of developing a food allergy can be exposed to potential food allergens as early as 6 months of age, according to a joint statement by the Canadian Paediatric Society (CPS) and Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (CSACI).
“Delaying dietary exposure to potential allergens like peanuts, fish or eggs will not reduce your child’s risk of developing a food allergy,” said Dr. Edmond Chan, paediatric allergist and co-author of the statement. “However, once a new food is introduced, it is important to continue to offer it regularly to maintain your child’s tolerance.”
Babies are considered at high risk of developing a food allergy if they have a parent or sibling with an allergic condition, such as atopic dermatitis, a food allergy, asthma or allergic rhinitis. The statement says that while these foods can be introduced to high-risk babies, the decision about when should be individualized and based on the parents’ comfort level. The CPS advises parents who are unsure to talk to their physician.
“We also don’t recommend avoiding milk, egg, peanut or other foods while pregnant or breastfeeding,” said Dr. Carl Cummings, co-author of the statement and chair of the CPS Community Paediatrics Committee. “There is no evidence to support the theory that avoiding certain foods during this time will prevent allergies in children.”
Food allergies affect approximately 7 per cent of Canadians. Some research suggests food allergy in babies is increasing, affecting over 10 per cent of one-year-olds.
Note: This refers to infants who have not yet developed a food allergy.  Complete avoidance of the food remains crucial if the child has a confirmed allergy. Allergic children should always have immediate access to an epinephrine auto-injector to treat symptoms of anaphylaxis.


CHILD study

 

Dr. Allan Becker is interviewed about the CHILD study in a segment about his latest Research at the Children's Hospital of Winnipeg. Watch this episode of Doctors Care to learn more. For more information, visit the Doctor Manitoba website.   


An Emerging Epidemic:  Food Allergies in America

The Discovery Channel recently released a documentary narrated by Steve Carrell about the food allergy epidemic in America. Click the following link to watch the documentary.

http://www.discoverychannelcme.com/patient-education/food-allergies

  

 

 

 

Anaphylaxis Canada have released a new resourse handbook titled "Living Confidently with Food Allergy" The handbook provides need-to-know information on managing food allergies for families of recently diagnosed children.     


Anaphylaxis Canada has also set up a new website - Newly Diagnosed Support Centre (NDSC), where you can:   

  • Download the handbook as a PDF file (or order a hard copy through our website)
  • Watch short videos on a variety of subjects
  • Download practice exercises 

 

These resources were created based on the results of a study - “Experiencing a first food allergic reaction: a survey of parents and caregivers perspectives” - which highlight the need for food allergy education and resources for families. Click here to see the press release about this study.  

 

Can Eating Healthy Cause A Severe Allergic Reaction? 

CBC's Marcy Markusa recently interviewed Dr. Allan Becker about fruits and vegetables potentially causing serious reactions in individuals with seasonal allergies, find out more by clicking the link!

http://www.cbc.ca/player/AudioMobile/Information%2BRadio%2B-%2BMB/ID/2388307402/

 

Study Links C-sections to Disease Susceptibility

New research shows that being born by C-section and being breastfed affects the bacteria fond in the baby’s gut.  Some of these bacteria play an important role in the development of the immune system and possibly in the development of some diseases as children get older. Follow the links below to read more about these interesting findings.

C-section babies missing crucial gut bacteria, study finds